This topic has 10 replies, 4 voices, and was last updated 3 years, 6 months ago by bjorklundbrian.

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  • #14836
     abernathysj
    • Experience: 5-10 years
    • Scenic Status: Full Time Regular

    Hi folks, I was wondering if anyone had a clever trick for preventing glazes from immediately settling at the bottom of a bucket and turning into a half-inch layer of near-impenetrable clay.

    [img]https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180327/2369cfa79d4c31ab1c5af009bbf35c44.jpg[/img]

    I am currently working on a show with miles of the same process, so mixing a little bit at a time seems inefficient. Also, I know the solution for remixing the glaze after it’s settled – pour out the liquid, carve up the sediment layer with a thin stir stick, add the liquid back in a little at a time – but I’d like to avoid that altogether, if possible.

    Is there something I can put in my bucket to keep the pigment and binder from settling? Some storage method that would help? This may just be an inconvenience we’re all fated to live with, but I thought I’d ask just in case some clever person has invented a solution. Thanks!

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    #15535
     Nixpaints
    • Experience: 20+ years
    • Scenic Status: Full Time Regular

    • Member
      Member Member

    What paints are you using and in what proportions? If I use Rosco Off Broadway in their glazes, I don’t get much settling at all. Even with the glaze diluted 3:1 with water.

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    #15536
     abernathysj
    • Experience: 5-10 years
    • Scenic Status: Full Time Regular

    Nixpaints wrote:

    What paints are you using and in what proportions? If I use Rosco Off Broadway in their glazes, I don’t get much settling at all. Even with the glaze diluted 3:1 with water.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    This is a mix of Off Broadway (Ultramarine Blue and Burnt Umber) and a black vinyl/acrylic “wall paint”. Maybe it’s the black that’s pulling everything down? But I’ve also heard that blue pigments tend to be heavy.

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    #15537
     Nixpaints
    • Experience: 20+ years
    • Scenic Status: Full Time Regular

    • Member
      Member Member

    abernathysj wrote:

    Nixpaints wrote:

    What paints are you using and in what proportions? If I use Rosco Off Broadway in their glazes, I don’t get much settling at all. Even with the glaze diluted 3:1 with water.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    This is a mix of Off Broadway (Ultramarine Blue and Burnt Umber) and a black vinyl/acrylic “wall paint”. Maybe it’s the black that’s pulling everything down? But I’ve also heard that blue pigments tend to be heavy.

    Sent from my iPhone using

    #15538
     abernathysj
    • Experience: 5-10 years
    • Scenic Status: Full Time Regular

    just water.

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    #15539
     Nixpaints
    • Experience: 20+ years
    • Scenic Status: Full Time Regular

    • Member
      Member Member

    Is it in Rosco glaze or polyurethane or just water?

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    #15540
     Nixpaints
    • Experience: 20+ years
    • Scenic Status: Full Time Regular

    • Member
      Member Member

    The water is your problem. If you don’t want settling, then thin your paints in Rosco glaze or some kind of polyurethane. You thin the Rosco glaze 1:1 with water anyway, but I dilute that even further sometimes and still don’t get sediment. For now, use a crap brush to stir it up until the paint is used up.

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    #15541
     Anonymous

    Try adding a bit of clear flat acrylic (or plastic varnish flat, etc) to the mix. The paint may still settle a bit, but it will help you avoid that rock-hard layer of sediment at the bottom and it will stir up much easier. You can play around with proportions, but I tend to thin with water like normal and add a bit of the flat acrylic at the end (maybe a 1/2 cup or so per gallon). If you’re still fighting sediment, attach a chip brush to the end of a stir stick and it will break up the sediment more quickly than just a stir stick.

    #15542
     abernathysj
    • Experience: 5-10 years
    • Scenic Status: Full Time Regular

    thanks, I’ll try that! I do love the chip brush stir stick, I have a pile of them here that I use all the time. the plain stir stick is just for the initial groundbreaking ceremony…

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    #15543
     abernathysj
    • Experience: 5-10 years
    • Scenic Status: Full Time Regular

    a scoop of Rosco flat acrylic was the perfect solution. even after a long weekend, they had barely settled and were very easy to stir up with a brush, no re-pouring required. thanks y’all!

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    #15544
     bjorklundbrian
    Admin
    • Experience: 20+ years
    • Scenic Status: Part Time Freelance

    • Member
      Member Member

    [attachment=0]dish brush.png[/attachment]
    I have several dish brushes like the one pictured that I use to stir the glaze. Works great. The flat acrylic is good as well.

    -B

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