This topic has 4 replies, 3 voices, and was last updated 1 year ago by Anonymous.

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  • #19753
     Rachael Claxton
    • Experience: 5-10 years
    • Scenic Status: Full Time Regular

    • Partner
      Partner Member

    Hey everyone,

    Recently I’ve encountered a lot of clients requesting that we use automotive paint on their projects. We’ve been able to get by here and there so far with using it on small projects, but are about to undertake something where there’s no avoiding it. So, now I need to learn. Using it in our open-faced spray booth has been a total pain in the past – dust gets everywhere and it’s impossible to get a nice clearcoat on it, so we know it’s time to invest in an enclosed spray booth. I’m looking to take a course on the basics of automotive paint – surface prep, process, application, etc.

    Has anyone taken one before or have any suggestions of where to begin? I’ve been doing a lot of googling and it seems like you can take a course on a specific paint system, or enroll in a technical school (which is not what I want). Thoughts?

    Thanks!

    #19758
     Scott Gerwitz
    Admin
    • Experience: 20+ years
    • Scenic Status: Full Time Regular

    • Partner
      Partner Member

    You could try advertising to hire an experienced auto painter and pay them a higher rate to train you. That actually might be your best option- Chicago Scenic actually switched to hiring an automotive painter.
    Or you could try asking a manufacturer for some training.
    Try Matthews Paint. Or Sherwin Williams, they have an automotive department.
    The manufacture route might work well, it would be in their interest to create a new client.

    #20071
     Anonymous

    HEALTH HAZARD! Please be aware that automotive paints in particular cause a HUGE amount of health problems, work related asthma, isocyanate exposure/poisoning,  and expose you toxins that have to be addressed in an OSHA compliant way. Open faced spray booth is not that, in fact an open faced spray booth is not OSHA compliant for solvent based applications. Warning …that is not a spray booth, that is a cheap boss solution to avoiding a healthy workplace. Your very first stop on this train ride would be getting your employer to understand the health risks associated with their request for using this paint, and the costs associated with bringing the shop to code for that. Second stop would be research on the toxins in the paint…start with the SDS sheet and research the exposures. I suggest any of the material published by Monona Rossol. I included a link below for reading. This Yale program is also working with Mt Sinai researching painter health issues. Odd fact, when you have this poisoning, gum and artificial sweeteners cause headaches and other issues. First hand experience talking.

    SDS, OSHA must be reviewed

    Automotive painting is NOT within the scope of traditional scenic and industrial finishes. It is. VERY specific use of VERY toxic materials that is VERY well regulated by almost every state.  A little digging should go a long way. Booths cost as much as a house in some states, because they require very specific permits, codes, exhaust/ventilation, Air quality measuring inside and out, and monitoring to remain compliant. The reason those codes are there is because MANY people have died or become ill using those paints.

    Please consider having the automotive paint pieces sent out to a professional booth/auto shop.

    All the best

    A

    https://medicine.yale.edu/intmed/prep/worker/measuring/

    https://www.bodyshopbusiness.com/your-lungs-your-skin-your-life/

     

    #20072
     Anonymous

    HEALTH HAZARD! Please be aware that automotive paints in particular cause a HUGE amount of health problems, work related asthma, isocyanate exposure/poisoning,  and expose you toxins that have to be addressed in an OSHA compliant way. Open faced spray booth is not that, in fact an open faced spray booth is not OSHA compliant for solvent based applications. Warning …that is not a spray booth, that is a cheap boss solution to avoiding a healthy workplace. Your very first stop on this train ride would be getting your employer to understand the health risks associated with their request for using this paint, and the costs associated with bringing the shop to code for that. Second stop would be research on the toxins in the paint…start with the SDS sheet and research the exposures. I suggest any of the material published by Monona Rossol. I included a link below for reading. This Yale program is also working with Mt Sinai researching painter health issues. Odd fact, when you have this poisoning, gum and artificial sweeteners cause headaches and other issues. First hand experience talking.

    SDS, OSHA must be reviewed

    Automotive painting is NOT within the scope of traditional scenic and industrial finishes. It is. VERY specific use of VERY toxic materials that is VERY well regulated by almost every state.  A little digging should go a long way. Booths cost as much as a house in some states, because they require very specific permits, codes, exhaust/ventilation, Air quality measuring inside and out, and monitoring to remain compliant. The reason those codes are there is because MANY people have died or become ill using those paints.

    Please consider having the automotive paint pieces sent out to a professional booth/auto shop.

    All the best

    A

    https://medicine.yale.edu/intmed/prep/worker/measuring/

    https://www.bodyshopbusiness.com/your-lungs-your-skin-your-life/

     

    #20073
     Anonymous

    HEALTH HAZARD! Please be aware that automotive paints in particular cause a HUGE amount of health problems, work related asthma, isocyanate exposure/poisoning,  and expose you toxins that have to be addressed in an OSHA compliant way. Open faced spray booth is not that, in fact an open faced spray booth is not OSHA compliant for solvent based applications. Warning …that is not a spray booth, that is a cheap boss solution to avoiding a healthy workplace. Your very first stop on this train ride would be getting your employer to understand the health risks associated with their request for using this paint, and the costs associated with bringing the shop to code for that. Second stop would be research on the toxins in the paint…start with the SDS sheet and research the exposures. I suggest any of the material published by Monona Rossol. I included a link below for reading. This Yale program is also working with Mt Sinai researching painter health issues. Odd fact, when you have this poisoning, gum and artificial sweeteners cause headaches and other issues. First hand experience talking.

    SDS, OSHA must be reviewed

    Automotive painting is NOT within the scope of traditional scenic and industrial finishes. It is. VERY specific use of VERY toxic materials that is VERY well regulated by almost every state.  A little digging should go a long way. Booths cost as much as a house in some states, because they require very specific permits, codes, exhaust/ventilation, Air quality measuring inside and out, and monitoring to remain compliant. The reason those codes are there is because MANY people have died or become ill using those paints.

    Please consider having the automotive paint pieces sent out to a professional booth/auto shop.

    All the best

    A

    https://medicine.yale.edu/intmed/prep/worker/measuring/

    https://www.bodyshopbusiness.com/your-lungs-your-skin-your-life/

     

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